Discrimination

  • June 14, 2024

    Justices' Harm Edict Tops 2024's Biggest Bias Rulings So Far

    A recent watershed U.S. Supreme Court ruling eased the level of harm workers must show to bring discrimination cases, while orders from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and a lower federal court clarified the justices' decision last year on religious accommodations. Here's a look at a quartet of rulings from the first half of this year that caught discrimination lawyers' attention.

  • June 14, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Delta's $16M Pay Stub Deal Up For Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for potential settlement approval in a pay stubs class action against Delta Air Lines that went to the Ninth Circuit and the California Supreme Court. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • June 14, 2024

    Deal In The Works To End EEOC, Walmart ADA Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Walmart alerted a North Carolina federal court that they've nearly reached a deal to resolve the agency's suit accusing the retailer of firing a worker because she couldn't get a doctor's OK to work without restrictions.

  • June 13, 2024

    Ex-Duke Doc Wants Panel To Redo Disability Bias Ruling

    A fired Duke University hospital doctor pressed a North Carolina state appeals court to reconsider not reviving the disability claims in his suit against the hospital, arguing that the case belongs before a jury.

  • June 13, 2024

    Seattle Port Presses Ex-Police Chief At Trial On HR Bashing

    The Port of Seattle confronted its former police chief on the stand Thursday in attempt to show it lawfully fired him for retaliating against an officer, presenting to jurors an email in which the ex-chief criticized the officer for complaining to HR, "the one place who would give him sanctuary."

  • June 13, 2024

    Apple Workers' Suit Says Women Are Paid Less For Same Work

    A pair of Apple workers lodged a proposed class action in California state court Thursday claiming that the company has systematically paid thousands of women less than their male counterparts for substantially similar work for years.

  • June 13, 2024

    Alston & Bird Wins Bid To Arbitrate COVID Vax Claims

    Alston & Bird LLP can arbitrate a former aide's allegations that she was fired after refusing to get the COVID-19 vaccine, a Georgia federal judge ruled Thursday, putting the litigation on ice pending the outcome of arbitration.

  • June 13, 2024

    8th Circ. Backs Wabtec In Fired Black Worker's Race Bias Suit

    The Eighth Circuit upheld Thursday the dismissal of a Black plant supervisor's suit claiming Wabtec fired him out of racial bias when it faulted him for violating its COVID-19 close contact disclosure policies, ruling that the former employee didn't show bias cost him a job rather than misconduct.

  • June 13, 2024

    Health Data Co. Beats Ex-GC's Federal Age Bias Claim

    A healthcare data analytics company has beaten back its former general counsel's claim that he was underpaid due to his age, with a New York federal judge saying the ex-employee offered some evidence to support his Age Discrimination in Employment Act claim, but not enough.

  • June 13, 2024

    EEOC Accuses 2 Employers Of Gender Identity, Gay Bias

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in federal courts Thursday accused an Alabama hotel of firing an employee because his style didn't conform to male stereotypes and an Illinois flooring company of failing to stop employees from making homophobic remarks, in violation of federal anti-discrimination law.

  • June 13, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Chicago Restaurant's Win Over Sex Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Thursday upheld a Chicago restaurant's defeat of a lawsuit alleging it fired a host for complaining that co-workers and customers touched her inappropriately and made offensive comments, saying she couldn't overcome the restaurant's assertion that she was terminated for poor performance.

  • June 13, 2024

    Brewpub Reaches $115K Deal To Exit EEOC Retaliation Suit

    A restaurant and brewery agreed Thursday to pay $115,000 to resolve a lawsuit from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing it of firing a Black cook for flagging verbal abuse of Black and Hispanic employees in the workplace, according to a filing in Georgia federal court.

  • June 13, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Conn. Town Worker's Sex Harassment Suit

    The Second Circuit gave a Connecticut town employee another shot Thursday at her suit claiming she endured years of harassing letters from a contractor who accused her of having sex with subordinates, saying a reasonable jury could find the town should have done more to intervene.

  • June 13, 2024

    McCarter & English Atty Named Frier Levitt Employment Head

    A former McCarter & English LLP partner of over 20 years with deep experience representing healthcare clients has moved to Frier Levitt to head the national firm's employment practice group, Frier Levitt announced Thursday.

  • June 13, 2024

    Delta Dodges Female Mechanic's Promotion, Pay Bias Suit

    Delta Air Lines Inc. defeated a mechanic's lawsuit claiming she was denied promotions and paid less than male colleagues because she's a woman, with a Utah federal judge ruling she hadn't shown she was treated differently from any comparable co-worker.

  • June 13, 2024

    Sheetz Asks To Ship EEOC Background Check Suit To Pa.

    Sheetz urged a Maryland federal court to send to Pennsylvania a suit lodged by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission over the convenience store chain's use of criminal background checks to make hiring decisions, saying that state is a more convenient location for everyone involved.

  • June 12, 2024

    FDIC Head Must Go To Change Status Quo, GOP Reps. Say

    House Republicans on Wednesday criticized Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chair Martin Gruenberg for not immediately resigning in the wake of a probe of the agency's workplace culture, but some Democrats took issue with the scope of a report on the investigation's findings while applauding his rumored successor.

  • June 12, 2024

    TV News Managers Blamed For Pride Memo Sue Nexstar

    Two former television news managers in western Michigan sued their former employer, Nexstar Media Group, this week, saying the company turned them into scapegoats amid backlash against an internal memo suggesting reporters dial back Pride Month coverage and include "both sides of the issue." 

  • June 12, 2024

    Fired SpaceX Workers Say Musk Runs Co. 'In The Dark Ages'

    Eight former SpaceX employees on Wednesday became the latest to sue the company and CEO Elon Musk alleging a hostile and abusive workplace that demeans women and LGBTQ+ people, saying in California state court they were unlawfully fired when they objected to his conduct.

  • June 12, 2024

    NY AG, Firms Beat Cuomo Subpoenas In Sex Harassment Suit

    Former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo can't force Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and Vladeck Raskin & Clark PC to produce information about an investigation into sexual misconduct accusations that forced him to resign, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, finding the firms were acting under the state attorney general's authority.

  • June 12, 2024

    9th Circ. Questions Arbitration Carveout For AmEx Workers

    A Ninth Circuit panel seemed inclined Wednesday to force four white former American Express employees to arbitrate their proposed class action claims alleging race bias.

  • June 12, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Worker's Anti-Vax Bias Suit Prematurely Tossed

    A trial court was too tough on a Christian job seeker when it threw out her religious bias lawsuit against an in-home healthcare provider that she alleged turned her away for refusing to get the COVID-19 vaccine, the Sixth Circuit ruled Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2024

    Home Depot Asks To Settle Claim It Shushed Worker On Probe

    Home Depot reached a proposed settlement to an allegation that it violated federal labor law by telling a Minneapolis worker to keep quiet about the company's investigation into his claims of racist treatment by a coworker, according to paperwork presented to a National Labor Relations Board judge.

  • June 12, 2024

    Ex-Wendy's Worker Drops Suit Over Breast-Pumping Space

    A former Wendy's employee who accused the company and multiple related entities of failing to provide proper private space for workers to pump breast milk despite federal labor laws requiring them to do so has permanently dropped her claims from Ohio federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    Associate Sues Kaufman Dolowich Alleging Disability Bias

    A former associate with national law firm Kaufman Dolowich & Voluck LLP claims in a federal lawsuit that attorneys at the firm's Philadelphia office discriminated against him after he asked for accommodations for his hearing impairment.

Expert Analysis

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

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    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Handling Neurodivergence As The Basis Of Disability Claims

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    Three recent discrimination claims in Rhode Island and New Jersey show how allegations of adverse treatment of neurodivergent individuals will continue to be tested in court, so employers should create an environment that welcomes the disclosure of such conditions, says Ting Cheung at Sanford Heisler.

  • Employers Should Take Surgeon's Sex Bias Suit As A Warning

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    A Philadelphia federal jury's recent verdict in a sex bias suit over Thomas Jefferson University's inaction on a male plaintiff's sexual harassment complaint is a reminder to employers of all stripes about the importance of consistently applied protocols for handling complaints, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Generative AI Adds Risk To Employee 'Self-Help' Discovery

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    Plaintiffs have long engaged in their own evidence gathering for claims against current or former employers, but as more companies implement generative AI tools, both the potential scope and the potential risks of such "self-help" discovery are rising quickly, says Nick Peterson at Wiley.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Employer Pointers As Wage And Hour AI Risks Emerge

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    Following the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence, employers using or considering artificial intelligence tools should carefully assess whether such use could increase their exposure to liability under federal and state wage and hour laws, and be wary of algorithmic discrimination, bias and inaccurate or incomplete reporting, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Race Bias Defense Considerations After 11th Circ. Ruling

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    In Tynes v. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed that the McDonnell Douglas test for employment discrimination cases is merely an evidentiary framework, so employers relying on it as a substantive standard of liability may need to rethink their litigation strategy, says Helen Jay at Phelps Dunbar.

  • 6 Ways To Minimize Risk, Remain Respectful During Layoffs

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    With a recent Resume Builder survey finding that 38% of companies expect to lay off employees this year, now is a good time for employers to review several strategies that can help mitigate legal risks and maintain compassion in the reduction-in-force process, says Sahara Pynes at Fox Rothschild.

  • NYC Workplace AI Regulation Has Been Largely Insignificant

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    Though a Cornell University study suggests that a New York City law intended to regulate artificial intelligence in the workplace has had an underwhelming impact, the law may still help shape the city's future AI regulation efforts, say Reid Skibell and Nathan Ades at Glenn Agre.