Discrimination

  • July 11, 2024

    Atty's Trial Antics Don't Doom $3.4M Bias Verdict, Judge Says

    A trucking company won't get a chance to retry a race discrimination lawsuit that ended in a $3.4 million verdict against it last year after a Georgia federal judge found Wednesday that the plaintiff's counsel's improper conduct at trial didn't prejudice the jury.

  • July 10, 2024

    ​GOP Bombards Agencies With Demands After Chevron's End

    Republican leaders of major congressional committees Wednesday demanded details from dozens of agencies on policies suddenly shrouded in uncertainty after U.S. Supreme Court conservatives overturned the so-called Chevron doctrine, which for 40 years gave regulators flexibility in rulemaking and advantages in related litigation.

  • July 10, 2024

    Atty Says Alaska Judge Reprimand Bolsters 4th Circ. Bias Suit

    A former public defender awaiting a bench ruling on her sexual harassment claims against the federal judiciary said Wednesday that the judge deciding her case should note a recent ruling reprimanding an Alaska federal judge for his "sexualized relationship" with a clerk in which the Ninth Circuit Judicial Council determined that intent was irrelevant.

  • July 10, 2024

    UMB Fired VP After Denying Further Cancer Leave, Suit Says

    UMB Financial Corp. fired an executive for requesting more time to recover from chemotherapy treatments, according to a suit filed in Colorado federal court, after she was made to work 12-hour days in preparation for her leave to complete the work she would miss while she was out.

  • July 10, 2024

    EEOC Vice Chair Says Muldrow Won't Impede Diversity Work

    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Vice Chair Jocelyn Samuels said Wednesday that the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Muldrow v. St. Louis should not hinder companies' diversity and inclusion efforts, despite fears the justices' decision opens these initiatives up to more legal attacks.

  • July 10, 2024

    4 State AI Bills To Watch In 2nd Half Of 2024

    After Colorado recently moved to the forefront of regulating artificial intelligence in the workplace, numerous other states across the ideological spectrum — including conservative bastions like Oklahoma — are considering legislation of their own. Here, Law360 looks at four bills to regulate the use of AI in the workplace that bear watching in the second half of 2024. 

  • July 10, 2024

    7th Circ. Won't Renew Honeywell DEI Video White Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit refused Wednesday to revive a former Honeywell engineer's claims he was unlawfully fired after he declined to watch a diversity, equity and inclusion training film that he claimed vilified white people, ruling he was only making assumptions since he never watched the video.

  • July 10, 2024

    Salt Co. CEO, Worker Settle Suit Over Spurned Affair

    A Seattle-area gourmet sea salt company has settled a discrimination suit by an employee who says she was demoted and ostracized when she rejected sexual advances from its founder and CEO, who allegedly tried to win her over by paying for a new car, a new apartment and her student loans.

  • July 10, 2024

    X Corp., Musk Dodge $500M Severance Suit

    X Corp. and Elon Musk can escape claims they owe former employees $500 million in severance following the business mogul's purchase of the social platform formerly known as Twitter, a California federal judge ruled, saying the facts don't show that federal benefits law governed the payments workers received.

  • July 10, 2024

    Former Conn. Top Public Defender Claims Bias Led To Ouster

    The former chief public defender in Connecticut has filed a second action challenging her June 4 ouster for misconduct, lodging an administrative appeal in state court that claims racial bias.

  • July 10, 2024

    House Panel Votes To Nix Biden's Retirement Advice Rule

    A Republican-controlled panel of U.S. House lawmakers advanced legislation Wednesday to block recently finalized regulations from the U.S. Department of Labor that expand the definition of a fiduciary under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, after a brief debate on retirement policy that clearly split along party lines.

  • July 10, 2024

    Bankruptcy Filing Halts Dueling Unions' Defamation Dispute

    One of two security and law enforcement unions embroiled in defamation suits in Michigan federal court has informed the court that it has filed for bankruptcy in Pennsylvania, pausing the claims against it a week before trial.

  • July 10, 2024

    Worker Says Law Firm Fired Her For Flagging Harassment

    A law firm brushed off a former accounts payable specialist's complaints that a male contractor was harassing her, telling her his actions were "laughable," and then fired her after she continued to bring up his conduct, she told a Virginia federal court.

  • July 10, 2024

    Atlanta, Ex-Worker Want Trial Rescheduled In Retaliation Case

    The city of Atlanta and a former city department head who says she was fired after blowing the whistle on failures in its immigrant outreach services asked a Georgia federal judge on Tuesday to reschedule a jury trial set to start in August to allow time for private mediation.

  • July 10, 2024

    6th Circ. Partly Revives Jailer's Disability Suit Over Chemicals

    The Sixth Circuit partially revived a deputy jailer's disability bias suit against a Tennessee county, tossing a district court's ruling that she failed to support discrimination claims over her termination and the county's alleged failure to accommodate her allergy to cleaning chemicals.

  • July 10, 2024

    Ohio Hospital Beats Fired Worker's COVID Testing Bias Suit

    An Ohio federal judge tossed a pharmacist's suit claiming a children's hospital flouted her beliefs by firing her after she refused the COVID-19 vaccine and weekly testing on religious grounds, ruling that she wasn't owed an accommodation that could have hurt hospital business.

  • July 09, 2024

    Ex-SF Transit Worker Tearfully Tells Of Vax-Mandate Firing

    A former San Francisco Bay Area train system police department member who claims the transit agency religiously discriminated with its COVID-19 vaccination mandate testified tearfully on Tuesday that he felt guilt and anxiety after losing his job, saying his family almost had to sell their home.

  • July 09, 2024

    With Chevron's End, LGBTQ+ Healthcare Regs Face New Risk

    The end of Chevron deference is already disrupting regulation meant to protect LGBTQ+ access to healthcare, with three federal judges blocking enforcement of a Biden administration rule prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity in healthcare.

  • July 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Revive Pilots' COVID Vax Preemption Fight

    The Sixth Circuit on Tuesday refused to revive a putative class action by Kalitta Air pilots who were fired over their refusal to get the COVID-19 vaccine, finding that the Railway Labor Act precludes the court from hearing their failure-to-accommodate and disability discrimination claims, which must be resolved through arbitration instead.

  • July 09, 2024

    BCBS Unit Fails To Stop Religious Vaccine Objector Suits

    A Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan subsidiary can't escape claims it treated differently employees who sought accommodations from a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, a Michigan federal judge ruled Tuesday, finding it plausible that religious discrimination "was at least a motivating factor" in the way the workers were dealt with.

  • July 09, 2024

    CBD Cos. Tell Justices RICO Can't Cover Personal Injury

    A trio of CBD companies on Tuesday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to find that a trucker fired for a positive drug test cannot bring a personal injury claim under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

  • July 09, 2024

    Miracle-Gro Scores Early Win In Benefits Cutoff Suit

    Scotts Miracle-Gro notched an early win in a former worker's lawsuit alleging she was forced out when her health benefits were cut after she asked to work remotely following a bout of COVID-19, with a Georgia federal judge ruling Tuesday her position necessitated in-person attendance.

  • July 09, 2024

    EEOC General Counsel Says She's Homing In On Hiring Bias

    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission general counsel Karla Gilbride said Tuesday her office is focused on holding employers accountable for hiring discrimination, noting the agency has access to company data that allows it to build a case that an individual job seeker cannot.

  • July 09, 2024

    7th Circ. Passes On Look At 2-Step Cert. Process, For Now

    A Seventh Circuit panel turned down pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly & Co.'s challenge to an Indiana federal court's decision to grant collective certification in an age discrimination suit, but said it would be open to looking at the two-step certification process in place to greenlight collectives.

  • July 09, 2024

    EEOC Asks 11th Circ. To Upend Coal Co. Win In Race Bias Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission urged the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday to reinstate a lawsuit against a coal company brought by two Black former workers, saying they adequately showed that a white worker was subjected to more lenient standards than they were.

Expert Analysis

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

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    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

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    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • Avoiding Jurisdictional Risks From Execs' Remote Work

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    Following a California federal court's recent decision in Evans v. Cardlytics — where the case was remanded to state court because the company’s executives worked remotely in California — there are several steps employers can take to ensure they will not be exposed to unfavored jurisdictions, says Eric Fox at Quarles & Brady.

  • 11th Circ. FMLA Ruling Deepens Divide Over Causation

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent ruling in Lapham v. Walgreen distinguishes the circuit as the loudest advocate for the but-for causation standard for assessing Family and Medical Leave Act retaliation claims, though employers in other jurisdictions may encounter less favorable standards and the U.S. Supreme Court will likely have to address the circuit split eventually, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Handling Neurodivergence As The Basis Of Disability Claims

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    Three recent discrimination claims in Rhode Island and New Jersey show how allegations of adverse treatment of neurodivergent individuals will continue to be tested in court, so employers should create an environment that welcomes the disclosure of such conditions, says Ting Cheung at Sanford Heisler.

  • Employers Should Take Surgeon's Sex Bias Suit As A Warning

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    A Philadelphia federal jury's recent verdict in a sex bias suit over Thomas Jefferson University's inaction on a male plaintiff's sexual harassment complaint is a reminder to employers of all stripes about the importance of consistently applied protocols for handling complaints, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Eye On Compliance: Workplace March Madness Pools

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    With March Madness set to begin in a few weeks, employers should recognize that workplace sports betting is technically illegal, keeping federal and state gambling laws in mind when determining whether they will permit ever-popular bracket pools, says Laura Stutz at Wilson Elser.

  • Generative AI Adds Risk To Employee 'Self-Help' Discovery

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    Plaintiffs have long engaged in their own evidence gathering for claims against current or former employers, but as more companies implement generative AI tools, both the potential scope and the potential risks of such "self-help" discovery are rising quickly, says Nick Peterson at Wiley.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Workplace AI Risks

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools penetrate workplaces, employers should incorporate sound AI policies and procedures in their handbooks in order to mitigate liability risks, maintain control of the technology, and protect their brands, says Laura Corvo at White and Williams.

  • Employer Pointers As Wage And Hour AI Risks Emerge

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    Following the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence, employers using or considering artificial intelligence tools should carefully assess whether such use could increase their exposure to liability under federal and state wage and hour laws, and be wary of algorithmic discrimination, bias and inaccurate or incomplete reporting, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Race Bias Defense Considerations After 11th Circ. Ruling

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    In Tynes v. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed that the McDonnell Douglas test for employment discrimination cases is merely an evidentiary framework, so employers relying on it as a substantive standard of liability may need to rethink their litigation strategy, says Helen Jay at Phelps Dunbar.

  • 6 Ways To Minimize Risk, Remain Respectful During Layoffs

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    With a recent Resume Builder survey finding that 38% of companies expect to lay off employees this year, now is a good time for employers to review several strategies that can help mitigate legal risks and maintain compassion in the reduction-in-force process, says Sahara Pynes at Fox Rothschild.

  • NYC Workplace AI Regulation Has Been Largely Insignificant

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    Though a Cornell University study suggests that a New York City law intended to regulate artificial intelligence in the workplace has had an underwhelming impact, the law may still help shape the city's future AI regulation efforts, say Reid Skibell and Nathan Ades at Glenn Agre.