Daily Litigation

  • Orrick's $8M Deal To End Data Breach Claims Nears Prelim OK

    A California federal judge indicated Friday that she'll preliminarily approve Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP's $8 million deal to end putative class claims over a 2023 data breach that purportedly exposed personal information for 638,000 individuals, but said the "very broad" scope of the settlement's release "raised my eyebrows."

  • Lindell No-Shows Amid Solvency Concerns In Sanctions Fight

    Attorneys for My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell were nowhere to be found Friday as a D.C. federal judge mulled how much they should pay in sanctions for counterclaims in election company Dominion's ongoing libel suit, saying he'd likely set an amount in the coming weeks.

  • WDTX Chief Adds New Hurdle For Patent Attys Eyeing Albright

    The Western District of Texas' chief judge has made it harder for parties to have their patent cases end up in U.S. District Judge Alan Albright's court by refusing to automatically connect related litigation.

  • Greek IT Company Sues NY Law Firm Over Leaked Patent Info

    A Greece-based technology company has sued Ladas & Parry LLP in New York federal court, alleging that the firm sent proprietary information to a third party while the company had an attorney-client agreement with the firm.

  • Texas Justices Take On Reach, Timing Of Atty Solicitation Law

    The Texas Supreme Court agreed Friday to consider whether personal injury attorneys can face claims they paid "case runners" to solicit grieving families in Louisiana and Arkansas, saying it will examine whether the state's barratry statute extends to out-of-state conduct and the applicable limitations period.

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    Former Miami City Atty Must Face Real Estate Fraud Suit

    A former Miami city attorney can't escape a lawsuit that alleges she aided her husband in a real estate fraud scheme after a Florida state appeals court found the complaint had sufficient allegations to survive her sovereign immunity assertions.

  • Lambda Legal To Expand With $180M Campaign

    Lambda Legal, a national nonprofit focused on the civil rights of LGBTQ+ people and those living with HIV, announced on Friday a $180 million fundraising campaign, along with an organizational strategy that aims to expand its legal team significantly by 2026.

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    The Supreme Court's Week: By The Numbers

    The U.S. Supreme Court issued three more rulings this week, including a unanimous one concerning the National Rifle Association's free speech rights and a split one ending a convicted murderer's long-running efforts to undo his death sentence. Here, Law360 Pulse takes a data-driven dive into the week that was at the U.S. Supreme Court.

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    Beasley Allen Wants J&J Subpoenas Nixed Amid Ethics Fight

    The Beasley Allen Law Firm and a plaintiff steering committee in the Johnson & Johnson talc litigation blasted subpoenas directed at the firm and others aimed at turning up evidence of an alleged scheme to muster opposition to J&J's latest $6.5 billion bankruptcy plan.

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    Snell & Wilmer Hires 2 Armstrong Teasdale Attys In Denver

    Snell & Wilmer announced Friday it expanded its team in Denver with the addition of a pair of lawyers from Armstrong Teasdale LLP, one a litigator and the other a corporate attorney.

  • Former Allstate Lawyer Settles Disability Bias Suit

    A former in-house lawyer at insurance giant Allstate has agreed to settle his dispute with the company alleging he was wrongfully fired because his doctor said he could no longer work on trials because of heart issues.

  • Smith Gambrell Faces Slimmed Data Breach Suit

    A California federal judge has trimmed the claims a proposed class of data breach victims brought against international law firm Smith Gambrell & Russell LLP, leaving the firm to face claims of negligence, invasion of privacy and violation of the California Unfair Competition Law.

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    Robins Kaplan Can't Escape Sanction Over Dropbox Access

    A New York state appeals court has upheld the $156,000 sanction on litigation funding firm KrunchCash and its counsel Robins Kaplan LLP for poking through an opposing party's Dropbox database that was accidentally shared in a $10 million suit, finding that they knew or should have known it was privileged information.

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    Del. Chancery Court Issues Another Round Of Rule Changes

    Delaware's nationally important Chancery Court on Friday announced its latest round of revisions to modernize its rules to more closely align with federal civil procedure rules and make them more user-friendly for litigants.

  • Fight Between Trustee, Law Firm May Mean Less For Creditors

    In the bankruptcy of collapsed California debt relief law firm Litigation Practice Group, a new law firm confirmed this week that it's not making payments to the bankruptcy estate, a situation that may limit a bankruptcy trustee's ability to make payments to creditors across the country.

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    Holland & Knight Litigator Joins Atlanta Appellate Boutique

    Atlanta appellate boutique Webb Daniel Friedlander LLP has brought on a former Holland & Knight LLP attorney who is now the sixth full-time attorney at the boutique, which opened two years ago.

  • Don't Fear AI Hallucinations, Embrace Them, Scholar Says

    When it comes to artificial intelligence, most early adopters fear the so-called hallucinations that the systems can produce. However, one scholar says the creativity those hallucinations represent is a valuable feature lawyers should embrace.

  • Texas Judge Opts Not To Recuse And Tosses Chamber Suit

    A Texas federal judge has thrown out the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's suit seeking to block the Federal Trade Commission from implementing a ban on noncompete clauses because a different plaintiff was first to file, adding he declined to recuse himself because no companies in his stock portfolio were parties in the case.

  • Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    The end of May marked another action-packed week for the legal industry as BigLaw firms made headlines and Donald Trump became the first former U.S. president convicted of a felony. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse’s weekly quiz.

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    GRSM50 Brings On Clausen Miller Insurance Pro In SF

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, which now goes by the name GRSM50, is expanding its team, announcing Thursday it is bringing on a Clausen Miller PC insurance specialist as a partner in its San Francisco office.

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    Regulator Says Attys Hit For AI Use Have Themselves To Blame

    An attorney for Colorado's ethics watchdog said Thursday that recent disciplinary action against lawyers for filing briefs with fake case citations generated by ChatGPT indicates a "lawyer problem" rather than issues with the technology.

  • 'I Don't Need Help Running The Court,' Judge Chides Attys

    A Michigan state judge on Thursday appeared frustrated with attorneys for MGM and its former law firm arguing over potential conflicts in an underlying case, telling them to stop avoiding his questions and saying he didn't "need help running the court."

  • Netflix Fails To Show Inventor, Funder Violated Injunction

    A California federal judge has said Netflix couldn't prove a Finnish inventor violated an injunction tied to his concealment of certain legal funds, or that a litigation fund manager the inventor worked with needs to face claims tied to that concealment.

  • Ex-Chicago Mayor Dodges Atty's Lawsuit Over Zoom Tirade

    An Illinois judge tossed a lawsuit brought by a former in-house attorney for the Chicago Park District accusing former Mayor Lori Lightfoot of unleashing a profane tirade laced with crude, insulting and defamatory comments during a Zoom call.

  • Troutman Pepper Fights Kwok Trustee's $2M Clawback Claim

    Troutman Pepper Hamilton Sanders LLP has defended its legal work for three entities connected to Ho Wan Kwok, saying the Chinese exile and alleged criminal fraudster's Chapter 11 trustee cannot avoid $2 million in payments to the firm because it earned its fees in good faith.

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Expert Analysis

  • How Law Firms Can Welcome And Celebrate Autistic Lawyers Author Photo

    As the U.S. observes Autism Acceptance Month, autistic attorney Haley Moss describes the societal barriers and stereotypes that keep neurodivergent lawyers from disclosing their disabilities, and how law firms can better accommodate and level the playing field for attorneys whose minds work outside of the prescribed norm.

  • Law Firm Tips For Evaluating AI And Machine Learning Tools Author Photo

    Many legal technology vendors now sell artificial intelligence and machine learning tools at a premium price tag, but law firms must take the time to properly evaluate them as not all offerings generate process efficiencies or even use the technologies advertised, says Steven Magnuson at Ballard Spahr.

  • A Call For Personal Accountability On Diversity And Inclusion Author Photo

    While chief legal officers are increasingly involved in creating corporate diversity, inclusion and anti-bigotry policies, all lawyers have a responsibility to be discrimination busters and bias interrupters regardless of the title they hold, says Veta T. Richardson at the Association of Corporate Counsel.

  • Learning How To Code Can Unleash New Potential In Lawyers Author Photo

    Every lawyer can begin incorporating aspects of software development in their day-to-day practice with little to no changes in their existing tools or workflow, and legal organizations that take steps to encourage this exploration of programming can transform into tech incubators, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Supporting Associates Amid Pandemic's Mental Health Toll Author Photo

    As junior associates increasingly report burnout, work-life conflict and loneliness during the pandemic, law firms should take tangible actions to reduce the stigma around seeking help, and to model desired well-being behaviors from the top down, say Stacey Whiteley at the New York State Bar Association and Robin Belleau at Kirkland.

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    Ask A Mentor: Should My Law Firm Take On An Apprentice? Author Photo

    Mentoring a law student who is preparing for the bar exam without attending law school is an arduous process that is not for everyone, but there are also several benefits for law firms hosting apprenticeship programs, says Jessica Jackson, the lawyer guiding Kim Kardashian West's legal education.

  • The Importance Of Client Engagement In Law Firm Innovation Author Photo

    As clients increasingly want law firms to serve as innovation platforms, firms must understand that there is no one-size-fits-all approach — the key is a nimble innovation function focused on listening and knowledge sharing, says Mark Brennan at Hogan Lovells.

  • The Unique Challenges Facing Women-Owned Law Firms Author Photo

    In addition to establishing their brand from scratch, women who start their own law firms must overcome inherent bias against female lawyers and convince prospective clients to put aside big-firm preferences, says Joel Stern at the National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms.

  • The Pursuit Of Wellness In BigLaw: Lessons From My Journey Author Photo

    Jane Jeong at Cooley shares how grueling BigLaw schedules and her own perfectionism emotionally bankrupted her, and why attorneys struggling with burnout should consider making small changes to everyday habits.

  • Why We Must Recruit And Advance More Black Prosecutors Author Photo

    Black Americans make up a disproportionate percentage of the incarcerated population but are underrepresented among elected prosecutors, so the legal community — from law schools to prosecutor offices — must commit to addressing these disappointing demographics, says Erika Gilliam-Booker at the National Black Prosecutors Association.

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    Ask A Mentor: How Can Associates Deal With Overload? Author Photo

    Young lawyers overwhelmed with a crushing workload must tackle the problem on two fronts — learning how to say no, and understanding how to break down projects into manageable parts, says Jay Harrington at Harrington Communications.

  • A Scientific Path For Improving Diversity At Law Firms Author Photo

    Law firms could combine industrial organizational psychology and machine learning to study prospective hires' analytical thinking, stress response and similar attributes — which could lead to recruiting from a more diverse candidate pool, say Ali Shahidi and Bess Sully at Sheppard Mullin.

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    Ask A Mentor: How Can Associates Seek More Assignments? Author Photo

    In the first installment of Law360 Pulse's career advice guest column, Meela Gill at Weil offers insights on how associates can ask for meaningful work opportunities at their firms without sounding like they are begging. 

  • Legal Sector Regulatory Reform Is Key To Closing Justice Gap Author Photo

    In order to improve access to justice for those who cannot afford a lawyer, states should consider regulatory innovations, such as allowing new forms of law firm ownership and permitting nonlawyers to provide certain legal services, says Patricia Lee Refo, president of the American Bar Association.

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